Burberry London Perfume
Man Fragrance

Burberry London For Men

Burberry London perfume: A Burberry fragrance launched in 1997. A rich Burberry perfume, beautifly blended Burberry for men cologne. "The smooth man fragrance".

Aroma Notes: Mint, Lavender, Sandalwood, Cedar, Rich Amber

Lavender Flowers


Lavandula (common name Lavender) is a genus of 39 species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Old World and is found from Cape Verde and the Canary Islands, southern Europe across to northern and eastern Africa, the Mediterranean, southwest Asia to southeast India. Many members of the genus are cultivated extensively in temperate climates as ornamental plants for garden and landscape use, for use as culinary herbs, and also commercially for the extraction of essential oils that are used in Burberry London perfume/perfumery. The most widely cultivated species, Lavandula angustifolia is often referred to as lavender, and there is a color named for the shade of the flowers of this species.

Flower spikes are used for dried flower arrangements. The fragrant, pale purple flowers and flower buds are used in potpourris. Lavender is also used extensively as herbal filler inside sachets used to freshen linens. Dried and sealed in pouches, lavender flowers are placed among stored items of clothing to give a fresh fragrance and to deter moths.

Dried lavender flowers have become recently popular for wedding confetti. Lavender is also popular in scented waters and sachets. The lavandins Lavandula × intermedia are a class of hybrids of L. angustifolia and L. latifolia. The lavandins are widely cultivated for commercial use, since their flowers tend to be bigger than those of English lavender and the plants tend to be easier to harvest, but lavandin oil is regarded by some to be of a lower quality than that of English lavender, with a perfume less sweet.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Burberry Perfume

Mint Leaves

Mint and Burberry London Perfume

Mentha (also known as mint, from Greek míntha, is a genus of plants in the family Lamiaceae (mint family). The species are not clearly distinct and estimates of the number of species varies from 13 to 18. Hybridization between some of the species occurs naturally. Many other hybrids, as well as numerous cultivars, are known in cultivation.The genus has a subcosmopolitan distribution across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and North America.

Mints are aromatic, almost exclusively perennial, rarely annual, herbs. They have wide-spreading underground and overground stolons and erect, square, branched stems. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, from oblong to lanceolate, often downy, and with a serrated margin. Leaf colors range from dark green and gray-green to purple, blue, and sometimes pale yellow. The flowers are white to purple and produced in false whorls called verticillasters.

The corolla is two-lipped with four subequal lobes, the upper lobe usually the largest. The fruit is a nutlet, containing one to four seeds. Menthol from mint essential oil (40–90%) is an ingredient of many cosmetics and Burberry London perfume/perfumery. Menthol and mint essential oil are also much used in medicine as a component of many drugs, and are very popular in aromatherapy. Menthol is also used in cigarettes as an additive, because it blocks out the bitter taste of tobacco and soothes the throat.

Sandal wood Tree Drawing


Sandalwood oil is an essential oil obtained from the steam distillation of chips and billets cut from the heartwood of the sandalwood tree. Sandalwood oil is used in Burberry London perfume, Burberry for men/perfumery, cosmetics, and sacred unguents. Sandalwood essential oil is used in medicine for the treatment of both somatic and mental disorders. A study investigating the effects of inhalation of East Indian sandalwood oil and its main compound, α-santalol, on human physiological parameters found that the compounds elevated pulse rate, skin conductance, and systolic blood pressure.

Whale Ambergris


Amber is fossilized tree resin (not sap), which has been appreciated for its color and natural beauty since Neolithic times. Much valued from antiquity to the present as a gemstone, amber is made into a variety of decorative objects. Amber is used as an ingredient in perfumes, as a healing agent in folk medicine, and as jewelry.  "Amber" perfumes may be created using combinations of labdanum, benzoin resin, copal (itself a type of tree resin used in incense manufacture), vanilla, Dammara resin and/or synthetic materials.

Labdanum is produced today mainly for the perfume industry. The raw resin is usually extracted by boiling the leaves and twigs. An absolute is also obtained by solvent extration.  An essential oil is produced by steam distillation. The raw gum is a black (sometimes dark brown), fragrant mass containing up to 20% or more of water. It is plastic but not pourable, and becomes brittle with age.

The absolute is dark amber-green and very thick at room temperature. The fragrance is more refined than the raw resin. The odor is very rich, complex and tenacious. Labdanum is much valued in perfumery because of its resemblance to ambergris, which has been banned from use in many countries because its precursor originates from the sperm whale, which is an endangered species: although the best-quality ambergris is found free-floating or washed up onshore (long exposure to sunlight, air and water removes offensive-smelling components of the fresh substance), and thus raises no ethical objections, a lower-quality version can also be recovered from some fraction of freshly slaughtered whales, and so may encourage poaching of sperm whales.

Labdanum is the main ingredient used when making the scent of amber in Burberry London perfume/perfumery. Labdanum's odor is variously described as amber, animalic, sweet, woody, ambergris, dry musk, or leathery.

Cedar Tree


Cedar-wood oil, is an essential oil derived from the foliage, and sometimes the wood and roots. It has many uses in medicine, art, industry and perfumery and while the characteristics of oils derived from various species may themselves vary, all have some degree of bactericidal and pesticidal effects. Cedar-wood oils each have characteristic woody odors which may change somewhat in the course of drying out. The crude oils are often yellowish or even darker in color and some, such as Texas cedar-wood oil are quite viscous and deposit crystals on standing.

They find use (sometimes after rectification) in a range of fragrance applications such as soap, as a man fragrance, perfumery, household sprays, floor polishes and insecticides.

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